Appropriations Committee Releases Fiscal Year 2020 State and Foreign Operations Funding Bill

Legislation rejects the President’s proposed 21 percent cut to the State Department, USAID, and related programs and increases funding by $2.2 billion above FY19 enacted levels.

 

Bill restores funding for critical diplomatic, development, and humanitarian programs, ensuring robust U.S. engagement with key international partners and programs.

WASHINGTON — The House Appropriations Committee today released the draft fiscal year 2020 State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs funding bill, which will be considered in subcommittee on Friday, May 10. The legislation funds the Department of State, the United States Agency for International Development, and other international programs and activities.

In total, the bill provides $56.4 billion in base discretionary funding—$2.2 billion above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $13.7 billion above the President’s budget request. This includes $48.4 billion in base discretionary funding for the State Department, USAID, commissions and related agencies under the jurisdiction of the subcommittee – $2.2 billion above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $5.7 billion above the President’s budget request. The bill provides $8 billion in Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on Terrorism (OCO/GWOT) funding for base requirements that would otherwise go unfunded in the President’s Budget Request.

The bill rejects the administration’s proposed cuts that would endanger national security and diminish America’s global standing, instead providing robust funding to advance our diplomatic and development priorities, address national security concerns, ensure the effectiveness of our foreign assistance, and strengthen the international partnerships that are critical to maintaining and expanding American influence and effectiveness on the world stage.

 

“This bill reflects Congressional priorities to advance U.S. foreign policy and our foreign assistance programs,”said House Appropriations Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs Chairwoman Nita Lowey.“It rejects the Administration’s unacceptable, irresponsible FY2020 requests and reaffirms strong support for reproductive health, climate change, and multilateral assistance. This bill would make strong investments that would protect our national security and repair America’s global standing and commitments.”

A summary of the draft fiscal year 2020 State-Foreign Operations funding bill is below. The full text of the bill is here. The subcommittee markup will be webcast live and linked from https://appropriations.house.gov/events/markups.

Bill Summary:

State Department Operations and Related Agencies – The bill contains a total of $17.2 billion in base and OCO funding for the operational costs of the State Department and related agencies, as well as diplomacy efforts to enhance peace and stability around the globe. This is an increase of $885.8 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level.

Within this amount, the legislation provides $6.1 billion for embassy security, the same as the fiscal year 2019 enacted level. These funds will address needs at more than 275 diplomatic facilities overseas, including facility upgrades and security personnel.

International Security Assistance – The bill provides a total of $11.2 billion in base and OCO funding for international security assistance, which includes $2.179 billion is for the Economic Support Fund.  This is $2.060 billion above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level.

The bill strives to foster greater stability and security overseas through “Smart Power.” Funds are included for economic support fund, international narcotics control and law enforcement activities, antiterrorism programs, nonproliferation programs, peacekeeping operations, and other critical international security efforts.  The President’s proposed cuts to diplomacy and development by more than 21% are ill-advised at best, and dangerous at worst. If enacted, such cuts would create risks to our national security, undermine United States leadership and stymie worldwide efforts to counter violent extremism and terrorism, making it harder to maintain American leadership in the world. Coupled with the Administration’s repeated attempts to end cooperation with multilateral organizations, these actions bolster the perception that the United States is not a reliable partner and threatens United States economic and national security.  The bills investments in security assistance continue to yield great dividends over time.  The bill also provides funding to fight terrorist financing networks and bolster border and airport security.

In addition, the legislation provides security assistance to key allies and partners.  The bill fully funds the $3.3 billion commitment to Israel.  The bill continues strong support for Foreign Military Financing programs for Ukraine, Georgia, Egypt, Jordan, and Tunisia – at or above current levels.

The bill maintains robust funding for counter-narcotics and law enforcement efforts in Colombia, Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean. The legislation also fully funds the $58 million request to address international organized crime and increases funding to combat cybercrime.

United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Operations – The bill contains $1.690 billion for USAID and the USAID Office of Inspector General – an increase of $174.2 million from the fiscal year 2019 enacted level. The legislation also includes oversight measures to ensure the proper management of development programs and the appropriate use of United States funds.

Bilateral Economic Assistance – The legislation contains a total of $24.018 billion in base and OCO funding for bilateral economic assistance to foreign countries – a decrease of $1.8 billion from the fiscal year 2019 enacted level, but the bill moves $2.179 billion in Economic Support Fund previously carried in Bilateral Economic Assistance to Security Assistance.   This funding is targeted to activities to provide stability in volatile regions and enhance United States presence in critical and strategic areas. Within this amount, programs that support development assistance, global health, and humanitarian assistance are prioritized.  In addition, the bill includes $6.3 billion to fight HIV/AIDS around the globe.

Multilateral Assistance – The legislation provides $2.338 billion for assistance to foreign countries through international organizations and banks, an increase of $481.6 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level.

Increases in funding for critical programs:

 

Family Planning & UNFPA:

  • $750 million for family planning – $175 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $513 million above the President’s budget request.
  • $55.5 million for UNFPA – $23 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $55.5 million above the President’s budget request.

Other Global Health Programs:

  • $2.616 billion for programs to improve maternal and child health and fight infectious diseases – $23 million above fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $818 million above the President’s budget request.

Peace Corps

  • $425 million for Peace Corps – $14.5 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $28.8 million above the President’s budget request.

President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), including the Global Fund:

  • $5.93 billion for PEPFAR, including $1.56 billion for the Global Fund – $210 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $1.6 billion above the President’s budget request.

 

International Basic Education:

  • $925 million for basic education – $125 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $696 million above the President’s budget request. This includes $125 million for multilateral partnerships in education.

Humanitarian Assistance:

  • $7.97 billion for humanitarian assistance under the accounts Migration & Refugee Assistance (MRA), U.S. Emergency Refugee & Migration Assistance (ERMA), and International Disaster Assistance (IDA) – $150 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $1.63 billion above the President’s budget request.

Educational and Cultural Exchange (ECE) Programs

  • $730 million for exchange programs – $29 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $420 million above the President’s budget request.

Biodiversity, Wildlife Trafficking, & the Global Environment Facility (GEF):

  • $295 million for biodiversity – $10 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $214.1 million above the President’s budget request.
  • $100.7 million for wildlife trafficking – $10 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $67.7 million above the President’s budget request.
  • $139.6 million for the GEF, of which $136.6 million is for the second installment of the seventh replenishment – consistent with fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $139.6 million above the President’s budget request, which was silent on the GEF.

 

Other Environment Programs:

  • $135 million for sustainable landscapes – $10 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $135 million above the President’s budget request.
  • New directives on adaptation ($177 million) and renewable energy ($179 million), prioritizing these programs, unlike prior years and the President’s budget request.

 

Democracy Programs & National Endowment for Democracy (NED):

  • $2.4 billion for Democracy programs – consistent with fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $1 billion above the President’s budget request.
  • $180 million for the NED – consistent with fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $113 million above the President’s budget request.
  • $273.7 million Democracy Fund, of which $172.7 million is for the State Department and $101 million for USAID – $46.5 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $273.7 million above the President’s budget request, which was silent on DF.

Assessed & voluntary contributions for peacekeeping activities:

  • $2.128 billion for Contributions for International Peacekeeping Activities (CIPA) – $577 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $992 million above the President’s budget request.
    • The House mark also fully pays the CIPA arrears from FY17 and FY18.
  • $516.3 million for Peacekeeping Operations (PKO) – $47 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $224 million above the President’s budget request.

Assessed & voluntary contributions to international organizations:

  • $1.52 billion to fully fund our assessed Contributions to International Organizations (CIO) – $160 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $1.01 billion above the President’s budget request.
  • $646.6 million for International Organizations & Programs (IO&P) – $307.5 million above the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $646.5 million above the President’s budget request.

 

U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP):

  • $38.6 million for USIP – consistent with fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $19.6 million above the President’s budget request.

The Asia Foundation:

  • $19 million for the Asia Foundation – $2 million above fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $19 million above the President’s budget request.

Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC):

  • $905 million for MCC – consistent with the fiscal year 2019 enacted level and $105 million above the President’s budget request.

 

U.S. International Development Finance Corporation (DFC):

  • The DFC is a new agency created by the BUILD Act of 2018 and will become operational at the beginning of fiscal year 2020. The House mark includes $164 million and an additional $2 million for the IG. The House mark is $134 million below the Administration’s FY 2020 request, largely due to a decrease in equity funding, and focuses on set up costs for the new corporation.

International Bank for Reconstruction and Development:

  • $206.5 million – to meet the new general capital increase, pending authorization.

Support for U.S. allies and partners, including:

(amounts are included in account totals above)

  • Israel:  $3.3 billion, fulfilling the MOU
  • Jordan:  $1.52 billion, fulfilling the MOU
  • Egypt: $1.4 billion, with governance and human rights reporting requirements
  • Assistance for Eastern Europe and Eurasia: $770.3 million, which is $425 million more than the Administration’s FY 2020 request
  • Central America: directs that not less than $540.8 million be made available for the countries of Central America and amends permissive language included in prior year Acts for FY17, FY18, and FY 2019 to require that the Administration meet the assistance directives for Central America included in those Acts.
  • Caribbean Basin Regional Security Initiative: Not less than $58 million
  • Colombia: $457.2 million, $39 million above FY 2019, and including not less than $51 million for rule of law and human rights activities
  • Democracy and the rule of law in Venezuela: Not less than $17.5 million
  • Countering Russian Influence Fund: $280 million
  • Tibet:  $17 million

 

Policy Provisions:

Support for women’s reproductive rights:

  • The House mark includes the Global HER Act, which would permanently repeal the Global Gag Rule, reinstated by President Trump in January 2017.
  • It also includes a prohibition on current and prior funds from being used to implement the Mexico City Policy.
  • The House mark does not include a prohibition carried in prior House bills on assistance to UNFPA.
  • The House mark ends the exclusion of family planning from global health authorities and allows family planning products to benefit from the HIV/AIDS Working Capital Fund.

Emphasizes gender equality:

  • The House mark includes $50 million to support women’s leadership, $165 million to prevent and respond to gender-based violence, and $15 million to address women at risk of violent extremism.

Green Climate Fund:

  • The House mark removes the prohibition on the Green Climate Fund from the fiscal year 2019 enacted bill and replaces it with permissive authority. It also prohibits the use of funds to withdraw from the Paris Agreement.

Lautenberg Amendment:

  • The House mark includes the “Lautenberg Amendment,” which protects refugee eligibility for historically persecuted religious minorities.

Restoring staffing levels:

  • The House mark reverses the impact of the Administration’s hiring freeze and restores State Department and USAID personnel to 2016 levels.

Protecting development priorities:

  • The House mark protects development priorities by differentiating between funding of long-term development goals funded through Development Assistance in title III and shorter-term, political and diplomatic objectives funded though Economic Support Fund in title IV.

Protecting critical partner agencies and organizations:

  • The House mark rejects the Administration’s request to close or consolidate the U.S. African Development Foundation, the Inter-American Foundation, the East-West Center, the Asia Foundation, and the U.S. Trade and Development Agency.

Nuclear technology to Saudi Arabia:

  • The House mark includes new language prohibiting funds from supporting the sale of nuclear technology to Saudi Arabia.

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